Home Checklist

Check it carefully

New home or not so new, it pays to know what to look for regarding its structure, equipment and surroundings. Though a final assessment can be made by an inspection service company, this checklist can serve as a reminder of what you should look for - in order to make a wise buying decision.

  Foundation. Check floors and walls for evidence of water seepage or moisture problems. Minor settling cracks not structurally significant.
  Drainage. Sump pump for foundation draining. Crawl space dry.
  Termite and wood rot. May require inspection from qualified exterminator for existing and potential problems.
  Floors. Condition of flooring, whether plank or plywood. Solid construction of bridging and joists.
  Walls. Condition of walls, whether drywall or plaster. Absence of water marks.
  Attic. Sufficiently insulated and ventilated.
  Fireplace. Damper in working order, flues to chimney clear.
  Heating. Type of plant...minor periodic maintenance required - oil fan motor, lubricate bearings, clean humidifier, replace filters, etc.
  Hot water system. Type and gallon capacity. How long present unit in service (if older home).
  Electrical. Standard house current, number of circuits, outlets and circuit breakers sufficient for everyday needs. Condition of wiring.
  Plumbing. Good water pressure throughout house. Tie-in to local water supply and sewage disposal system. Pipe joints clean and rust-free.
  Appliances and fixtures. Range, refrigerator, dishwasher/disposal, laundry facilities, etc. all in working order. Accommodation for gas grill hook-up. Bathroom and kitchen fixtures in good shape.
  Lot and landscaping. Grading level or properly contoured. Trees and shrubs sufficient for needs. Fences, walks, patio and driveway in good condition.
  Exterior walls. Type suitable to weather conditions, need for any periodic maintenance (painting).
  Doors and windows. Easy to open and close (or replace) for storm/screen removal or installation.
  Roof. Gutters and downspouts in good condition. If older home, how long have shingles been in use? (Normal 20-25 year life-span.) Chimney flashing tightly caulked.
  Garage. Doors or opener in good working order. Sufficient electrical and heating access.
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